Engineered Eloquence

Read, Think, Write, Repeat

The New Passport-Poor | by Atossa Araxia Abrahamian | NYR Daily | The New York Review of Books

July 15, 2019

Casablanca is more than seventy-five years old. If released today, it would surely be criticized for its moralizing American nationalism, as well as for celebrating French colonial rule without featuring a single Moroccan protagonist. Read as a migration narrative, however, Casablanca reminds us that the identification papers we carry were created not to give us freedom but rather to curtail it. The right to mobility is granted not by the individual but by the state, and access to that right is dictated largely along class lines. The poor, unwanted abroad and unable to pay for the required visas, transit costs, and even basic documentation, stay trapped, while the rich can come and go as they please. In 2016, a record 82,000 millionaires moved to a new country thanks to immigration policies designed to attract the ultrarich, essentially by selling citizenship and residence permits. That year also, populist politicians around the world, from Austria to the Philippines, won over large numbers of voters by promising to keep the riff-raff out.

-The New Passport-Poor | by Atossa Araxia Abrahamian | NYR Daily | The New York Review of Books

Read More

Where even Walmart won’t go: how Dollar General took over rural America | Business | The Guardian

July 15, 2019

Not everything is to be had for a dollar, but rarely is anything priced above $10. But there is a cost. Dollar General’s aggressive pricing drives locally owned grocery stores out of business, replacing shelves stocked with fresh fruit, vegetables and meat with the kinds of processed foods underpinning the country’s obesity and diabetes crisis.

-Where even Walmart won’t go: how Dollar General took over rural America | Business | The Guardian

Read More

Make Music, A Third Draft

April 5, 2019

I often feel curmudgeonly since removing myself from much of social media. I made a conscious and conscientious decision to do so for my own sanity and I did so with little fanfare; after all, it should affect only a very small portion of the world if I am not actively liking and retweeting poorly designed typeface-focused platitudes. This is the third draft of this sentiment. The first had no bite, the second was all bite (in all honesty, it was a rant), but those were for me; this one is for you.

Read More